Complaints of mould in the Hazen Hall Annex lead to suggestions of better air circulation

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Reports of mould in the Hazen Hall Annex have been revealed as nothing more than poor ventilation, according to the Environmental Health, Safety and Security Office (EHSS).

On Sept. 13, those who had their offices in the building filed complaints of an overpowering smell of mildew that made it hard to breathe in and around room 14. Representatives from the EHSS were sent in to investigate the issue. David Gillespie, the department’s manager, found upon initial investigation of the spot, that there appeared to be water stains on the ceiling. Further exploration of these areas showed that it was in good condition with no sign of damage whatsoever, and the stains had just appeared over time.

With the mould problem still not sorted, Gillespie moved on to check the walls, which were also found to be completely dry and sturdy, along with the rest of the building. The only actual damage caused came from the inspectors themselves as they opened up certain locations to examine. With the Facilities Management team sent in to patch up the holes and paint over the unsightly water spots with a sealant-based paint, members of the EHSS were stuck racking their brains for an answer to the issue.

Eventually, as their report states, they found that the musty smell was most likely due to the massive amounts of paper and files stored in the affected room. The report says that this, “combined with the fact that the room is seldom aired out by opening window[s] and doors, allowing air to circulate,” is the root cause of the building’s problems.

As long as the place gets some good air flow before the weather gets cold, those in the Hazen Hall Annex can breathe easy.