Faces of UNBSJ: Buddy up to Bill McLeod

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Bill McLeod has been a familiar face on campus for many years now. Some students may know him as the helpful security guard while others may know him as the friendly evening cleaner on campus.

McLeod came to UNBSJ in 2006 when he was hired as a campus security guard. In 2011 he sought a change of pace and became a Floor Tech for Spruce Grove, the cleaners who are contracted by the university. “I’m a jack of all trades,” says McLeod in reference to his job switch, “and a master of none.”

McLeod didn’t want to divulge is exact age, but he did say, “I’m old enough to know better, but still too young to care.”

He was raised by his parents, Bill and Eleanor and grew up in Forest Hills, East Saint John where he went to Milledgeville North High School and was a member of their last graduating class.

As a kid, McLeod says he had a perfect childhood. He says he liked to do the same things as most kids; bike riding, listening to music and hanging out at the playground. Even though he had fun in his childhood, “I was the type of child where we respected our elders and did what we were told,” says McLeod.

Growing up, McLeod had aspirations of becoming a cop or a physical educator, but instead of seeking secondary education he joined the reserves. He was a Private in the 31 Service Battalion for four years.

If given his choice of careers now, McLeod would go in the complete opposite direction. “I’d probably like to be an actor because I can make people laugh,” he says.

Photo taken by Ocean-Leigh Peters

“On my days off I like to do anything. Play games, chill, have a few drinks, watch movies or TV,” say McLeod. His favourite shows include Californication, The Walking Dead, and The Glades. However, he admits, “I couldn’t get into Dexter.” McLeod plays everything from Wii to PS3, but no matter what system he’s playing on, the James Bond games are his favourite.

When it comes to working on campus, McLeod has enjoyed his time as a security guard as well as a cleaner. As a security guard, “my favourite thing was the people. I’ve seen a lot of kids come and go,” he says. As a cleaner he says it’s not the same as security where he knew all of the students. “There’s not really one particular thing I like about cleaning, it’s a whole.” He does however enjoy “scrubbing and waxing floors, I feel like I’ve accomplished something,” says McLeod.

McLeod believes, “I’m a problem solver, an ear to listen and to offer advice. People can come to me,” he says. That includes students who may need someone to listen when they can’t talk to anyone else. 

McLeod would like the students to know he’s there for them if they need him, and “if you can do anything with your life, then go for it, do it.”